On second glance: Still no high-level pop-out effect for faces

@article{VanRullen2006OnSG,
  title={On second glance: Still no high-level pop-out effect for faces},
  author={Rufin VanRullen},
  journal={Vision Research},
  year={2006},
  volume={46},
  pages={3017-3027}
}
  • R. VanRullen
  • Published 1 September 2006
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Vision Research
A recent article in this journal (Hershler, O., & Hochstein, S. (2005). At first sight: A high-level pop out effect for faces. Vision Research, 45(13), 1707-1724) reported, in contradiction to several earlier studies, that photographs of human faces can be searched for efficiently (i.e., "pop out") among photographs of other objects (as long as these objects are not "too similar" to faces). An apparent search asymmetry between faces and other categories (houses, cars) pointed to the existence… Expand

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