On reading Newton as an Epicurean: Kant, Spinozism and the changes to the Principia☆

@article{Schliesser2013OnRN,
  title={On reading Newton as an Epicurean: Kant, Spinozism and the changes to the Principia☆},
  author={Eric S. Schliesser},
  journal={Studies in History and Philosophy of Science},
  year={2013},
  volume={44},
  pages={416-428}
}
  • E. Schliesser
  • Published 1 September 2013
  • Philosophy
  • Studies in History and Philosophy of Science
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The first two sections of this paper investigate what Newton could have meant in a now famous passage from “De Graviatione” (hereafter “DeGrav”) that “space is as it were an emanative effect of God.”
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The precise nature of the force of gravitational attraction was always problematic for Isaac Newton. As is well known he was forced by the criticism of Leibniz to acknowledge in the General Scholium
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