On medieval Kerala mathematics

@article{Rajagopal1986OnMK,
  title={On medieval Kerala mathematics},
  author={C. T. Rajagopal and Mythili Rangachari},
  journal={Archive for History of Exact Sciences},
  year={1986},
  volume={35},
  pages={91-99}
}
The two latter series are also found stated in the Tantrasangraha in the related forms 1 ίπ'2 s3 1 /π'4^5 [Β,] rsine = 5__|_j_ ίπ'2 + _y /π'4^5 __..., and 1 ίπ' s2 1 /π'3 sA M 'COs9 = '-2!(t)t+4!(t) 1 ίπ' 1 /π'3 ?--> where, in a circle of radius r, the angle 0 is understood to be subtended at the centre by an arc s ^ c = ' nr. Furthermore, the Tantrasangraha announces the three approximations (to the length of the quadrant of unit diameter) 
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e Darstellung der Regeln seine Zuhörer entmuthigte , die sich bis auf zwei , unter welchen Polack war , in den ersten sechs Wochen verliefen , ehe Hermann noch die Hälfte der Geometrie abgehandelt