On lizards of the family pygopodidae. A contribution to the morphology and phylogeny of the squamata

@article{Underwood1957OnLO,
  title={On lizards of the family pygopodidae. A contribution to the morphology and phylogeny of the squamata},
  author={Garth Underwood},
  journal={Journal of Morphology},
  year={1957},
  volume={100}
}
  • G. Underwood
  • Published 1 March 1957
  • Biology
  • Journal of Morphology
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Classification of Geckos
TLDR
Of the three families of geckos recognized the two which conserve primitive ophthalmological characters, Eublepharidae and Sphaerodactylidae, are procœlous and the Gekkonidae s.s., which show the most complete conversion to secretive and nocturnal habits, are secondarily amphicœLous. Expand
The carotid sinus complex and epithelial body of Varanus varius
THE ORIGIN OF SNAKES
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The ancestors of snakes, irrespective of their habits, were closely related to the platynotid lizards, and the respective merits of these assumptions must mainly be assessed on evidence obtained from study of living forms. Expand
MODES OF EVOLUTION DISCERNIBLE IN THE TAXONOMY OF SNAKES
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The relation to the lizards is especially ternal organs, with reduction or loss of clear from the remarkable copulatory apone of the lungs; a peculiarly efficient paratus of paired hemipenes, retractable mode of locomotion by wriggling, with by invagination into the base of the tail, extreme flexibility of the vertebral column, which is peculiar to lizards and snakes. Expand
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