On freedom and planning in science: The Society for Freedom in Science, 1940–46

@article{Mcgucken1978OnFA,
  title={On freedom and planning in science: The Society for Freedom in Science, 1940–46},
  author={W. Mcgucken},
  journal={Minerva},
  year={1978},
  volume={16},
  pages={42-72}
}
Prior to the 1930s few scientists in Great Britain troubled to pay any attention to the question of freedom in scientific research. Like other things which are taken for granted, it was not discussed. But during the late 1930s and early 1940s the situation changed; it changed so drastically in the eyes of some scientists that they felt compelled to create an organisation for the protection of freedom in science. This was the Society for Freedom in Science.1 The Society continued its activities… Expand
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