On conviction's collective consequences: integrating moral conviction with the social identity model of collective action.

@article{vanZomeren2012OnCC,
  title={On conviction's collective consequences: integrating moral conviction with the social identity model of collective action.},
  author={Martijn van Zomeren and Tom Postmes and Russell Spears},
  journal={The British journal of social psychology},
  year={2012},
  volume={51 1},
  pages={
          52-71
        }
}
This article examines whether and how moral convictions predict collective action to achieve social change. Because moral convictions - defined as strong and absolute stances on moral issues - tolerate no exceptions, any violation motivates individuals to actively change that situation. We propose that moral convictions have a special relationship with politicized identities and collective action because of the potentially strong normative fit between moral convictions and the action-oriented… Expand
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  • Europe's journal of psychology
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