On Territoriality in Ungulates and an Evolutionary Model

@article{OwenSmith1977OnTI,
  title={On Territoriality in Ungulates and an Evolutionary Model},
  author={Norman Owen-Smith},
  journal={The Quarterly Review of Biology},
  year={1977},
  volume={52},
  pages={1 - 38}
}
  • N. Owen-Smith
  • Published 1977
  • Biology
  • The Quarterly Review of Biology
The behavioral characteristics of territorial ungulates are reviewed and compared with non-territorial species in terms of social distribution, spatial dispersion, and interaction patterns. Territoriality is related proximally to dominance and ultimately to mating exhancement. Alternative male mating strategies are categorized. Selective gains are estimated by the potential mating enhancement factor (PMEF) and costs by reduced chances of survival. The likely lifetime mating enhancement (LLME… Expand
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