On Lying and Being Lied To: A Linguistic Analysis of Deception in Computer-Mediated Communication

@inproceedings{Hancock2007OnLA,
  title={On Lying and Being Lied To: A Linguistic Analysis of Deception in Computer-Mediated Communication},
  author={Jeffrey T. Hancock and Lauren Curry and Saurabh Goorha and Michael Woodworth},
  year={2007}
}
This study investigated changes in both the liar's and the conversational partner's linguistic style across truthful and deceptive dyadic communication in a synchronous text-based setting. An analysis of 242 transcripts revealed that liars produced more words, more sense-based words (e.g., seeing, touching), and used fewer self-oriented but more other-oriented pronouns when lying than when telling the truth. In addition, motivated liars avoided causal terms when lying, whereas unmotivated liars… CONTINUE READING

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