On Distance from the Truth as a True Distance

@inproceedings{Miller1979OnDF,
  title={On Distance from the Truth as a True Distance},
  author={David W. Miller},
  year={1979}
}
False scientific theories, we imagine, can differ in their closeness to the truth. Popper’s qualitative theory of verisimilitude ([1963], pp. 228–237) sought to explain this difference as a variation in the set of true consequences coupled with a countermodulation in the false. That is to say, B is more truthlike than A is if all A’s true consequences are consequences of B, and all B’s false consequences are consequences of A, and at least one of these inclusions is proper. Writing CtT(A) and… Expand
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  • Philosophy
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