On Cyberslacking: Workplace Status and Personal Internet Use at Work

@article{Garrett2008OnCW,
  title={On Cyberslacking: Workplace Status and Personal Internet Use at Work},
  author={R. Kelly Garrett and James N. Danziger},
  journal={Cyberpsychology \& behavior : the impact of the Internet, multimedia and virtual reality on behavior and society},
  year={2008},
  volume={11 3},
  pages={
          287-92
        }
}
  • R. GarrettJames N. Danziger
  • Published 7 June 2008
  • Business
  • Cyberpsychology & behavior : the impact of the Internet, multimedia and virtual reality on behavior and society
Is personal Internet use at work primarily the domain of lower-status employees, or do individuals higher up the organizational hierarchy engage in this activity at equal or even greater levels? We posit that higher workplace status is associated with significant incentives and greater opportunities for personal Internet use. We test this hypothesis using data collected via a recent national telephone survey (n = 1,024). Regression analyses demonstrate that, contrary to conventional wisdom… 

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