Oligogyny by unrelated queens in the carpenter ant, Camponotus ligniperdus

@article{Gadau1998OligogynyBU,
  title={Oligogyny by unrelated queens in the carpenter ant, Camponotus ligniperdus},
  author={J{\"u}rgen R. Gadau and Pia J. Gertsch and J{\"u}rgen Heinze and Pekka Pamilo and Bert Hölldobler},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={1998},
  volume={44},
  pages={23-33}
}
Abstract Multilocus DNA fingerprinting and microsatellite analysis were used to determine the number of queens and their mating frequencies in colonies of the carpenter ant, Camponotus ligniperdus (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). Only 1 of 61 analyzed queens was found to be double-mated and the population-wide effective mating frequency was therefore 1.02. In the studied population, 8 of 21 mature field colonies (38%) contained worker, male, or virgin queen genotypes which were not compatible with… 

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