Olfactory recognition of predators by nocturnal lizards: safety outweighs thermal benefits

@article{Webb2010OlfactoryRO,
  title={Olfactory recognition of predators by nocturnal lizards: safety outweighs thermal benefits},
  author={J. Webb and D. Pike and R. Shine},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology},
  year={2010},
  volume={21},
  pages={72-77}
}
  • J. Webb, D. Pike, R. Shine
  • Published 2010
  • Biology
  • Behavioral Ecology
  • Many prey species are faced with multiple predators that differ in the degree of danger posed. The threat-sensitive predator avoidance hypothesis predicts that prey should assess the degree of threat posed by different predators and match their behavior according to current levels of risk. To test this prediction, we compared the behavioral responses of nocturnal velvet geckos, Oedura lesueurii, to chemicals from 2 snakes that pose different threats: the dangerous broad-headed snake… CONTINUE READING

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