• Corpus ID: 28255848

Olfactory neuropathy in severe acute respiratory syndrome: report of A case.

@article{Hwang2006OlfactoryNI,
  title={Olfactory neuropathy in severe acute respiratory syndrome: report of A case.},
  author={Chi-shin Hwang},
  journal={Acta neurologica Taiwanica},
  year={2006},
  volume={15 1},
  pages={
          26-8
        }
}
  • Chi-shin Hwang
  • Published 1 March 2006
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Acta neurologica Taiwanica
This case was a 27 years old female with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). She suffered from typical symptoms of SARS. Although she got almost complete recovery from most symptoms after treatment, she noted acute onset complete anosmia 3 weeks after the onset of her first symptom. Her brain MRI examination did not show definite lesion except an incidental finding of left temporal epidermoid cyst. Her anosmia persisted for more than 2 years during following up. Peripheral neuropathy and… 
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