Of Warrior Chiefs and Indian Princesses: The Psychological Consequences of American Indian Mascots

@article{Fryberg2008OfWC,
  title={Of Warrior Chiefs and Indian Princesses: The Psychological Consequences of American Indian Mascots},
  author={Stephanie A. Fryberg and H. Markus and D. Oyserman and Joseph Stone},
  journal={Basic and Applied Social Psychology},
  year={2008},
  volume={30},
  pages={208 - 218}
}
Four studies examined the consequences of American Indian mascots and other prevalent representations of American Indians on aspects of the self-concept for American Indian students. When exposed to Chief Wahoo, Chief Illinwek, Pocahontas, or other common American Indian images, American Indian students generated positive associations (Study 1, high school) but reported depressed state self-esteem (Study 2, high school), and community worth (Study 3, high school), and fewer achievement-related… Expand
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