Of Mania: Introduction

@article{Berros2004OfMI,
  title={Of Mania: Introduction},
  author={Germ{\'a}n E. Berr{\'i}os},
  journal={History of Psychiatry},
  year={2004},
  volume={15},
  pages={105 - 124}
}
  • G. Berríos
  • Published 1 March 2004
  • Psychology
  • History of Psychiatry
Classic Text No. 57 is meant to illustrate the way in which the old, pre-1800 clinical notion of mania was transformed into its current counterpart. In Classical times, the term ‘mania’ had been used to refer to three orders of objects: medical (as featured in this introduction and in the Classic text), theological (two Greek deities) (Smith, 1870) and epistemological. In regard to the last, a mania of ‘divine’ origin is mentioned by Plato in the Phaedrus, as a way to gain full knowledge, i.e… 
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