Octopus vulgaris Uses Visual Information to Determine the Location of Its Arm

@article{Gutnick2011OctopusVU,
  title={Octopus vulgaris Uses Visual Information to Determine the Location of Its Arm},
  author={Tamar Gutnick and Ruth A. Byrne and Binyamin Hochner and Michael J. Kuba},
  journal={Current Biology},
  year={2011},
  volume={21},
  pages={460-462}
}

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