Ocean acidification: the other CO2 problem.

@article{Doney2009OceanAT,
  title={Ocean acidification: the other CO2 problem.},
  author={Scott C. Doney and Victoria J. Fabry and Richard A Feely and Joan A. Kleypas},
  journal={Annual review of marine science},
  year={2009},
  volume={1},
  pages={
          169-92
        }
}
Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), primarily from human fossil fuel combustion, reduces ocean pH and causes wholesale shifts in seawater carbonate chemistry. The process of ocean acidification is well documented in field data, and the rate will accelerate over this century unless future CO2 emissions are curbed dramatically. Acidification alters seawater chemical speciation and biogeochemical cycles of many elements and compounds. One well-known effect is the lowering of calcium carbonate… CONTINUE READING

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