Ocean Iron Fertilization--Moving Forward in a Sea of Uncertainty

@article{Buesseler2008OceanIF,
  title={Ocean Iron Fertilization--Moving Forward in a Sea of Uncertainty},
  author={Ken O. Buesseler and Scott C. Doney and David M. Karl and Philip W. Boyd and Ken Caldeira and Fei Chai and Kenneth H. Coale and Hein J. W. de Baar and Paul G. Falkowski and K S Johnson and Richard Stephen Lampitt and Anthony F. Michaels and Syed Wajih Ahmad Naqvi and V. Smet{\'a}cek and Shigenobu Takeda and Andrew J. Watson},
  journal={Science},
  year={2008},
  volume={319},
  pages={162 - 162}
}
It is premature to sell carbon offsets from ocean iron fertilization unless research provides the scientific foundation to evaluate risks and benefits. 

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