Occurrence and molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. in mammals and reptiles at the Lisbon Zoo

@article{Alves2005OccurrenceAM,
  title={Occurrence and molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. in mammals and reptiles at the Lisbon Zoo},
  author={Margarida Alves and Lihua Xiao and Vanessa Lemos and Ling-ye Zhou and Vitaliano A. Cama and Margarida Bar{\~a}o da Cunha and Olga Matos and Francisco Antunes},
  journal={Parasitology Research},
  year={2005},
  volume={97},
  pages={108-112}
}
The presence of Cryptosporidium parasites in mammals and reptiles kept at the Lisbon Zoo was investigated. A total of 274 stool samples were collected from 100 mammals and 29 reptiles. The species and genotype of the isolates identified by light microscopy were determined by nested PCR and sequence analysis of a fragment of the small subunit rRNA gene. Cryptosporidium oocysts were found in one black wildebeest (Connochaetes gnou), one Prairie bison (Bison bison bison) and in one Indian star… 
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