Occupational therapy intervention for residents in a skilled nursing facility: a focus on atypical patients.

Abstract

The 1990 implementation of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (OBRA) has expanded opportunities for occupational therapists to treat individuals with non-traditional illnesses. Therapists working in skilled nursing and long term care can benefit from gaining an understanding of the OBRA guidelines and patient's rights, especially regarding restraint reduction. Occupational therapists possess the necessary skills to assess and treat these individuals to help maximize their functioning as well as improve their quality of life (Moon-Sperling & Pinson, 1991). The premise of this article is to inform therapists about various types of ethical and legal intervention with atypical patients in skilled nursing facilities and to introduce therapists to the laws supporting provision of these services. [Article copies available for a fee from The Haworth Document Delivery Service: 1-800-342-9678. E-mail address: getinfo@haworth.com].

DOI: 10.1080/07380579709168830

Cite this paper

@article{Elliott1997OccupationalTI, title={Occupational therapy intervention for residents in a skilled nursing facility: a focus on atypical patients.}, author={Sara J. Elliott}, journal={Occupational therapy in health care}, year={1997}, volume={10 4}, pages={53-74} }