Occupational exposure to suicide: A review of research on the experiences of mental health professionals and first responders

@article{Lyra2021OccupationalET,
  title={Occupational exposure to suicide: A review of research on the experiences of mental health professionals and first responders},
  author={Renan Lopes de Lyra and Sarah K. McKenzie and Susanna Every-Palmer and Gabrielle L S Jenkin},
  journal={PLoS ONE},
  year={2021},
  volume={16}
}
Exposure to suicide is a major factor for suicidality. Mental health professionals and first responders are often exposed to suicide while on-duty. The objective of this scoping review is to describe the state of current research on exposure to suicide among mental health professionals and first responders, focusing on the prevalence and impact of exposure to suicide, and to identify current gaps in the literature. We searched MEDLINE, Scopus, PsychNET, and Web of Science and identified 25… 

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