Occlusion effect of earmolds with different venting systems.

@article{Kiessling2005OcclusionEO,
  title={Occlusion effect of earmolds with different venting systems.},
  author={J{\"u}rgen Kiessling and Barbara Brenner and Charlotte Thunberg Jespersen and Jennifer Groth and Ole Dyrlund Jensen},
  journal={Journal of the American Academy of Audiology},
  year={2005},
  volume={16 4},
  pages={
          237-49
        }
}
In this study the occlusion effect was quantified for five types of earmolds with different venting. Nine normal-hearing listeners and ten experienced hearing aid users were provided with conventional earmolds with 1.6 and 2.4 mm circular venting, shell type earmolds with a novel vent design with equivalent cross-sectional vent areas, and nonoccluding soft silicone eartips of a commercial hearing instrument. For all venting systems, the occlusion effect was measured using a probe microphone… Expand
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References

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TLDR
A simple system has been developed with sintered filters in the vent line, thus allowing all earmolds to be vented to relieve the occluded ear sensation although retaining the acoustic characteristics of the closed earmold. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
The results indicated that the bone conducted SRT procedure is sensitive enough to differentiate between the occlusion effect created by shell earmolds versus canal hearing aids. Expand
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TLDR
It is suggested that vented earmoulds should be used to achieve target insertion gain in order to maximize patients' acceptance of hearing aids. Expand
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