Obstetric care of Jehovah’s Witnesses: a 14-year observational study

@article{Massiah2007ObstetricCO,
  title={Obstetric care of Jehovah’s Witnesses: a 14-year observational study},
  author={Nadine Massiah and Shobana Athimulam and Chin Loo and Stanley Okolo and Wai Yoong},
  journal={Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics},
  year={2007},
  volume={276},
  pages={339-343}
}
Over a 14-year period, the obstetric outcome of Jehovah’s Witnesses in an inner city hospital was reviewed and the effect of refusal of blood on morbidity and mortality evaluated. Ninety women had 116 deliveries and of these, 24% were delivered by caesarean section, 10% had instrumental deliveries and 66% were normal vaginal deliveries. Postpartum haemorrhage of >1,000 mls occurred in 6% and postpartum anaemia was the commonest complication. The mean postdelivery haemoglobin (11.10 ± 1.15 g/dl… 

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