Observing Gay, Lesbian and Heterosexual Couples' Relationships

@article{Gottman2003ObservingGL,
  title={Observing Gay, Lesbian and Heterosexual Couples' Relationships},
  author={John Mordechai Gottman and Robert W Levenson and Catherine Swanson and Kristin R. Swanson and Rebecca Tyson and Dan Yoshimoto},
  journal={Journal of Homosexuality},
  year={2003},
  volume={45},
  pages={65 - 91}
}
ABSTRACT Two samples of committed gay and lesbian cohabiting couples and two samples of married couples (couples in which the woman presented the conflict issue to the man, and couples in which the man presented the conflict issue to the woman) engaged in three conversations: (1) an events of the day conversation (after being apart for at least 8 hours), (2) a conflict resolution conversation, and (3) a pleasant topic conversation. The observational data were coded with a system that… 
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