Observations on the biology of Afro–tropical Hesperiidae (Lepidoptera) principally from Kenya. Part 2. Pyrginae: Tagiadini

@article{Cock2011ObservationsOT,
  title={Observations on the biology of Afro–tropical Hesperiidae (Lepidoptera) principally from Kenya. Part 2. Pyrginae: Tagiadini},
  author={Matthew J. W. Cock and T. Colin E. Congdon},
  journal={Zootaxa},
  year={2011},
  volume={2893},
  pages={1-66}
}
Partial life histories for 13 Afro–tropical Tagiadini (Hesperiidae: Pyrginae) are described and illustrated: Eagris sabadius astoria Holland, E. s. andracne (Boisduval), E. lucetia (Hewitson), E. decastigma purpura Evans, Tagiades flesus (Fabricius), Caprona pillaana Wallengren, Netrobalane canopus (Trimen), Abantis arctomarginata Lathy, A. bamptoni Collins & Larsen, A. zambesiaca (Westwood), A. paradisea (Butler), A. meru Evans and A. venosa Trimen. Generalisations are made for the tribe in… 
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