Observations on the behaviours of three European cuckoo bumble bee species (Psithyrus)

@article{Fisher2005ObservationsOT,
  title={Observations on the behaviours of three European cuckoo bumble bee species (Psithyrus)},
  author={R. M. Fisher},
  journal={Insectes Sociaux},
  year={2005},
  volume={35},
  pages={341-354}
}
  • R. Fisher
  • Published 1 December 1988
  • Biology
  • Insectes Sociaux
SummaryFemales of three European species of cuckoo bumble bees (P. bohemicus, P. vestalis, andP. campestris) were introduced into free-foraging laboratory colonies of theirBombus hosts (B. locorum, B. Terrestris andB. pascuorum, respectively). The colony development of one successfully parasitized colony of each bumble bee species was studied.Psithyrus females cohabited with host queens and workers, but monopolized brood development through oophagy, larval ejection and the attempted dominance… Expand

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