Observations of some further Pulsed Radio Sources

@article{Pilkington1968ObservationsOS,
  title={Observations of some further Pulsed Radio Sources},
  author={J. D. H. Pilkington and Antony Hewish and Sherrill J. Bell and T. W. Cole},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1968},
  volume={218},
  pages={126-129}
}
Details are now given of three of the four pulsating radio sources discovered at Cambridge. 
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Further Observations of Pulsating Radio Sources
New observations make a binary star model unlikely and reveal complex frequency structure in individual pulses.
Optical Identification of the First Neutron Star?
A more precise position for one of the rapidly pulsating radio sources has been found. This has suggested that the source is associated with an eighteenth magnitude blue star.
Observation of a Rapidly Pulsating Radio Source
Unusual signals from pulsating radio sources have been recorded at the Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory. The radiation seems to come from local objects within the galaxy, and may be associated
Rapidly Pulsing Radio Sources
The gravitational lens effect associated with a neutron star binary gives results which agree well with recent observations of a new class of rapidly pulsing radio sources. Further tests of the
Pulsating Radio Source at α = 19h19m, δ = +22°
Signals from one of the rapidly pulsating radio sources have been recorded on three frequencies using the mark I radio telescope at the Nuffield Radio Astronomy Laboratories. The size of the source,
Pulsating Radio Source at |[alpha]| = 19h19m, |[delta]| = |[plus]|22|[deg]|
  • 1968