Objective tinnitus in benign intracranial hypertension: An update

@article{Sismanis1990ObjectiveTI,
  title={Objective tinnitus in benign intracranial hypertension: An update},
  author={Aristides Sismanis and F M Butts and Gordon B. Hughes},
  journal={The Laryngoscope},
  year={1990},
  volume={100}
}
Previously, the authors reported that objective pulsatile tinnitus can be the major or only manifestation of benign intracranial hypertension. This report updates the authors' experience with 31 patients managed over the past 7 years. 
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TLDR
Controversy pertaining to the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of idiopathic intracranial hypertension are reviewed.
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We report the unusual case of pulsatile tinnitus caused by muscular branches of the occipital artery, which developed to supply the distal vertebral artery after subclavian artery occlusion.
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This chapter covers the gamut of intracranial venous issues, ranging from the most common entity – developmental venous anomalies – to the nonexistent: “chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency.”
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TLDR
A 21‐year‐old developed progressive headaches and pulsatile tinnitus and was found to have papilledema and a pulsatile bruit and dural arteriovenous malformation draining into the superior sagittal sinus.
Pulsatile tinnitus: contemporary assessment and management
  • A. Sismanis
  • Medicine
    Current opinion in otolaryngology & head and neck surgery
  • 2011
TLDR
Pulsatile tinnitus deserves a thorough evaluation and, in the majority of cases, there is a treatable underlying cause and the possibility of a life-threatening cause needs to be ruled out in every patient with pulsatileTinnitus.
Ligation of the internal jugular vein in venous hum tinnitus.
TLDR
Previously known as cephalic bruit and essential objective tinnitus, the venous hum tinnitis presents as pulse synchronous unilateral objective t Finnitus.
Pseudotumor Cerebri Presenting Unilateral Papilledema Associated with Iron-deficiency Anemia
TLDR
A 44-year-old, non-obese, female patient presenting with unilateral papilledema and iron-deficiency anemia is presented, emphasizing this unusual presentation and the rare association with iron deficiency.
Pulsatile Tinnitus and Spontaneous Cerebrospinal Fluid Rhinorrhea: Indicators of Benign Intracranial Hypertension Syndrome
  • Emily F. Rudnick, A. Sismanis
  • Medicine
    Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
  • 2005
TLDR
The otolaryngologist is urged to consider BIH syndrome as a possible diagnosis in patients presenting with pulsatile tinnitus and CSF rhinorrhea and encourage an evaluation for treatment of obesity as a primary therapeutic goal.
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