Obesity in the new millennium

@article{Friedman2000ObesityIT,
  title={Obesity in the new millennium},
  author={Jeffrey M. Friedman},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2000},
  volume={404},
  pages={632-634}
}
  • J. Friedman
  • Published 6 April 2000
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Nature
Obesity has increased at an alarming rate in recent years and is now a worldwide public health problem. In addition to suffering poor health and an increased risk of illnesses such as hypertension and heart disease, obese people are often stigmatized socially. But major advances have now been made in identifying the components of the homeostatic system that regulates body weight, including several of the genes responsible for animal and human obesity. A key element of the physiological system… 
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