Obesity and the human microbiome

@article{Ley2010ObesityAT,
  title={Obesity and the human microbiome},
  author={Ruth E. Ley},
  journal={Current Opinion in Gastroenterology},
  year={2010},
  volume={26},
  pages={5–11}
}
  • R. Ley
  • Published 1 January 2010
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Current Opinion in Gastroenterology
Purpose of review Obesity was once rare, but the last few decades have seen a rapid expansion of the proportion of obese individuals worldwide. Recent work has shown obesity to be associated with a shift in the representation of the dominant phyla of bacteria in the gut, both in humans and animal models. This review summarizes the latest research into the association between microbial ecology and host adiposity, and the mechanisms by which microbes in the gut may mediate host metabolism in the… 
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Discoveries in the interrelationship between diet, intestinal microbiome, and body immune system provide us novel perceptions to the specific action mechanisms and will promote the development of therapeutic approaches for obesity.
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