• Corpus ID: 52023126

OSTEOLOGICAL, CHEMICAL AND GENETIC ANALYSES OF THE HUMAN SKELETON FROM A NEOLITHIC SITE REPRESENTING THE GLOBULAR AMPHORA CULTURE (KOWAL, KUYAVIA REGION, POLAND)

@inproceedings{Kozowski2014OSTEOLOGICALCA,
  title={OSTEOLOGICAL, CHEMICAL AND GENETIC ANALYSES OF THE HUMAN SKELETON FROM A NEOLITHIC SITE REPRESENTING THE GLOBULAR AMPHORA CULTURE (KOWAL, KUYAVIA REGION, POLAND)},
  author={Tomasz Kozłowski and Beata Stepańczak and Laurie J. Reitsema and Grzegorz Osipowicz and Krzysztof Szostek and Tomasz Płoszaj and Krystyna Jędrychowska-Dańska and Czesława Paluszkiewicz and Henryk W. Witas},
  year={2014}
}
In 2007 a ceremonial complex representing the Globular Amphora Culture was discovered in Kowal (the Kuyavia region, Poland). Radiocarbon dating demonstrated that the human remains associated with the complex are of similar antiquity, i.e., 4.105 ± 0.035 conv. and 3.990 ± 0.050 conv. Kyrs. After calibration, this suggests a period between 2850 and 2570 BC (68.2% likelihood), or more specifically, 2870 to 2500 BC (95.4% likelihood). Morphological data indicate that the skeleton belonged to a male… 
Dairying history and the evolution of lactase persistence
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Observations montrent que le lait des animaux domestiques était exploité dès les débuts de la domestication au Néolithique, tandis que les échantillons d’acide désoxyribonucléique ancien humain provenant ofert que ces populations européennes étaient majoritairement intolérantes au lactose.
The Late Neolithic sepulchral and ritual place of site 14 in Kowal (Kuyavia, Central Poland)
Zusammenfassung: Forschungsgegenstand dieses Artikels ist ein Begräbnis- und Ritualplatz der Kugelamphoren-Kultur der Fundstätte 14 in Kowal (Zentral-Polen). Die Stätte umfasst einen Submegalithen
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  • 2019

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