ONE SIZE FITS ALL? RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN THE SIZE AND DEGREE OF VARIATION IN GENITALIA AND OTHER BODY PARTS IN TWENTY SPECIES OF INSECTS AND SPIDERS

@article{Eberhard1998ONESF,
  title={ONE SIZE FITS ALL? RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN THE SIZE AND DEGREE OF VARIATION IN GENITALIA AND OTHER BODY PARTS IN TWENTY SPECIES OF INSECTS AND SPIDERS},
  author={William G. Eberhard and Bernhard A. Huber and R. S. and R. Daniel Brice{\~n}o and Isabel Salas and Viterbo Rodriguez},
  journal={Evolution},
  year={1998},
  volume={52}
}
Hypotheses regarding the function of elaborate male genitalia were tested in a sample of insects and spiders by comparing their allometric values (slopes in log‐log regressions on indicators of body size) with those of other body parts. Male genitalia consistently had lower slopes than other body parts. Perhaps as a consequence of this pattern, genitalic size also tended, though less consistently, to have lower coefficients of variation than did the size of other body parts. The morphological… 
ALLOMETRY OF GENITALIA IN INSECTS AND SPIDERS: ONE SIZE DOES NOT FIT ALL
  • A. Green
  • Biology
    Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 1999
TLDR
It is demonstrated that the results of Eberhard et al. (1998) are dependent on the methodology used in their analyses and that reanalysis using more appropriate methods shows that the evidence that genitalia tend to be negatively allometric is not conclusive.
Allometric Relationship Between Genitalic Size and Body Size in Two Species of Mordellid Beetles (Coleoptera: Mordellidae)
TLDR
The results reinforce the evidence in favor of stabilizing selection on genitalic size, as there is no unequivocal proof for the existence of cryptic female choice.
Sexual selection, phenotypic variation, and allometry in genitalic and non-genitalic traits in the sexually size-dimorphic stick insect Micrarchus hystriculeus
TLDR
A negative allometric scaling pattern and low phenotypic variation of clasper size is suggestive of stabilizing selection and supports the ‘one-size-fits-all’ hypothesis.
Distinctive developmental variability of genital parts in the sexually dimorphic beetle, Prosopocoilus inclinatus (Coleoptera: Lucanidae)
TLDR
The results strongly support the view that developmental trajectories of genital traits are not necessarily integrated, and large variation among different genital parts in coefficients of variation and in values of the switch point where the allometric relations varied significantly are found.
Extreme body size variability in the golden silk spider ( Nephila edulis ) does not extend to genitalia
TLDR
In Nephila edulis, the genitalia of the females experience less stabilizing selection than those of the males, and the mode of selection seems to cause developmental instability in degrees of fluctuating asymmetry but in the degree of data scatter which indicates a lower coefficient of determination.
Coevolution of female and male genital components to avoid genital size mismatches in sexually dimorphic spiders
TLDR
Internal dimensions of female genitalia evolve independently of female body size in nephilid spiders, and similarly, male intromittent genital size evolves independently of the male body size.
Allometry and morphological trait relationship in the sexually dimorphic Chinese dobsonfly, Acanthacorydalisasiatica (Wood-Mason, 1884) (Megaloptera, Corydalidae)
TLDR
The hypothesis that the male mandibles of this sexually dimorphic species are sexually selected to enlarge, whereas the male genitalia are stable to be intermediate regardless of a great variation in body size is examined.
HAVE MALE AND FEMALE GENITALIA COEVOLVED? A PHYLOGENETIC ANALYSIS OF GENITALIC MORPHOLOGY AND SEXUAL SIZE DIMORPHISM IN WEB‐BUILDING SPIDERS (ARANEAE: ARANEOIDEA)
TLDR
Using modern phylogenetic methods with 16 species of orb‐weaving spiders, this work provides strong evidence for the “positive genitalic divergence” model, implying that sexual genitalic dimorphism (SGD) increases as SSD increases, and infer that divergence in SGD could limit SSD both in spiders, and potentially in other taxa as well.
Are differences in variation and allometry in testicular size of two sibling species of the genus Mus (Mammalia, Rodentia) caused by female promiscuity?
TLDR
The high phenotypic variance and positive allometry in testicular growth confirmed the suggestion that males with larger testes and a higher production of testosterone may be more competitive and more successful in post-copulatory selection.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 75 REFERENCES
Sexual size dimorphism and selection in the wild in the waterstrider Aquarius remigis: Body size, components of body size and male mating success
TLDR
While the net pressures of contemporary selection for the species may still act to maintain sexual size dimorphism, sexual selection alone does not.
Patterns of variation in tail ornament size in birds
TLDR
Elongated tail ornaments in four species of whydahs Vidua, the forktailed flycatcher Tyrannus savana and the Asian paradise flycatchers Terpsiphone paradisi did not show higher geographical variation than the body size characters, suggesting that there is no line of equilibria for these ornamments.
TWO-YEAR LIFE CYCLE AND LOW PALPAL CHARACTER VARIANCE IN A GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAIN POPULATION OF THE LAMP-SHADE SPIDER (ARANEAE, HYPOCHILIDAE,HYPOCHILUS)
TLDR
Size-frequency histograms and other data generated from four samples show that a Hypochilus population in the Great Smoky Mountains has a two-year life cycle with the following schedule: spiderlings emerge from egg sacs and construct their first webs in late May; 15 to 18 months later, during their second autumn, these spiders mature, mate, and lay eggs.
Female control : sexual selection by cryptic female choice
TLDR
Cryptic female choice establishes a new bridge between sexual selection theory and reproductive physiology, in particular the physiological effects of male seminal products on female reproductive processes, such as sperm transport, oviposition, and remating.
Copulatory courtship and morphology of genitalic coupling in seven Phyllophaga species (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae)
TLDR
Dissections of pairs frozen in copula demonstrated that males transfer large quantities of material to females during copulation that is not physically rela...
Environmental control of horn length dimorphism in the beetle Onthophagus acuminatus (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae)
  • D. Emlen
  • Biology
    Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
  • 1994
TLDR
Results from experiments designed to assess the relative importance of genetic and environmental factors as determinants of male horn morphology support recent theories on sexual selection which predict that male ornaments will evolve to be reliable indicators of male quality.
Directional Patterns of Female Mate Choice and the Role of Sensory Biases
TLDR
It is suggested that studies of mate choice will benefit by a more integrative approach, especially one that combines knowledge of sensory mechanisms with appropriate phylogenetic comparisons, to distinguish among competing hypotheses for the evolution of female mating preferences.
Functional Morphology of Male Genitalic Surstyli in the Dungflies Achisepsis diversiformis and A. ecalcarata (Diptera: Sepsidae)1
TLDR
Alternative hypotheses for surstylus function are discussed; a combination of physical restraint and stimulation of the female seems most likely.
ARTIFICIAL SELECTION ON HORN LENGTH‐BODY SIZE ALLOMETRY IN THE HORNED BEETLE ONTHOPHAGUS ACUMINATUS (COLEOPTERA: SCARABAEIDAE)
  • D. Emlen
  • Biology
    Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 1996
Males of the horned beetle Onthophagus acuminatus Har. (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) exhibit horn length dimorphism due to a sigmoidal allometric relationship between horn length and body size: the
...
1
2
3
4
5
...