ON THE NECESSITY OF AN INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACH TO LANGUAGE UNIVERSALS

@inproceedings{Reali2008ONTN,
  title={ON THE NECESSITY OF AN INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACH TO LANGUAGE UNIVERSALS},
  author={Florencia Reali and Morten H. Christiansen},
  year={2008}
}
There is considerable variation across the languages of the world, nonetheless it is possible to discern common patterns in how languages are structured and used. The underlying source of this variation as well as the nature of crosslinguistic universals is the focus of much debate across different areas of linguistics. Some linguists suggest that language universals derive from the inner workings of Universal Grammar (UG)—a set of innate constraints on language acquisition (e.g., see Bever… 
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