ODYSSEUS AND HIS BED. FROM SIGNIFICANT OBJECTS TO THING THEORY IN HOMER

@article{Grethlein2019ODYSSEUSAH,
  title={ODYSSEUS AND HIS BED. FROM SIGNIFICANT OBJECTS TO THING THEORY IN HOMER},
  author={Jonas Grethlein},
  journal={The Classical Quarterly},
  year={2019},
  volume={69},
  pages={467 - 482}
}
  • J. Grethlein
  • Published 1 December 2019
  • Art
  • The Classical Quarterly
Things in Homer cannot complain about a lack of attention. Nearly forty years ago, Jasper Griffin, in response to the oralist emphasis on composition and formulaic language, drew our attention to the many significant objects populating the Iliad and the Odyssey. Nestor's cup, for example, is so heavy that other men have difficulties to lift it; the cup illustrates the eminence of its owner who rubbed shoulders with the far greater heroes of the past. As Griffin demonstrated, Homer deftly uses… 

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