Nutritional factors and hair loss

@article{Rushton2002NutritionalFA,
  title={Nutritional factors and hair loss},
  author={David Hugh Rushton},
  journal={Clinical and Experimental Dermatology},
  year={2002},
  volume={27}
}
  • D. H. Rushton
  • Published 1 July 2002
  • Medicine
  • Clinical and Experimental Dermatology
Summary The literature reveals what little is known about nutritional factors and hair loss. What we do know emanates from studies in protein‐energy malnutrition, starvation, and eating disorders. In otherwise healthy individuals, nutritional factors appear to play a role in subjects with persistent increased hair shedding. Hård, 40 years ago, demonstrated the importance of iron supplements in nonanaemic, iron‐deficient women with hair loss. Serum ferritin concentrations provide a good… 
Prevalence of Nutritional Deficiencies in Hair Loss among Indian Participants: Results of a Cross-sectional Study
Background: Nutritional deficiencies are known to be associated with hair loss; however, the exact prevalence is not known. Aims: The aim of this study is to evaluate the prevalence of nutritional
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TLDR
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The Role of Vitamins and Minerals in Hair Loss: A Review
TLDR
The role of vitamins and minerals, such as vitamin A, vitamin B, vitamin C, vitamin D, vitamin E, iron, selenium, and zinc, in non-scarring alopecia is summarized.
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TLDR
A review of the state of the art in hair loss and nutrients relationship was done, highlighting minerals and vitamins which may concretely contribute to prevent or treat this unpleasant event.
Nutrients in Hair Supplements: Evaluation of their Function in Hair Loss Treatment
TLDR
A review of the state of the art in hair loss and nutrients relationship was done, highlighting minerals and vitamins which may concretely contribute to prevent or treat this unpleasant event.
Iron status in diffuse telogen hair loss among women.
TLDR
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Role of Iron Deficiency in Chronic Diffuse Hair Loss
TLDR
Serum ferritin, a marker of iron deficiency, was recorded in 150 consecutive patients of chronic diffuse hair loss and in healthy controls and it did not show any significant difference between these groups.
Iron deficiency in female pattern hair loss, chronic telogen effluvium, and control groups.
Analysis of Serum Zinc and Copper Concentrations in Hair Loss
TLDR
The hypothesis of zinc metabolism disturbances playing a key role in hair loss, especially AA and TE, whereas the effect of copper on hair growth and shedding cycles still needs more study is led.
Vitamin D level and telogen hair loss: A Case control study
TLDR
Deficiency in vitamin D may assume a possible leading cause of telogen effluvium among women with hair loss, and cases were significantly associated with low level of Vitamin D3 than controls.
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