Nutritional Supplements and Other Complementary Medicines for Infantile Colic: A Systematic Review

@article{Perry2011NutritionalSA,
  title={Nutritional Supplements and Other Complementary Medicines for Infantile Colic: A Systematic Review},
  author={Rachel Perry and Katherine Hunt and Edzard Ernst},
  journal={Pediatrics},
  year={2011},
  volume={127},
  pages={720 - 733}
}
BACKGROUND Complementary and alternative medicines often are advocated for infantile colic, yet there has been no synthesis of the evidence to inform current practice about their use. [...] Key Method Reference lists of retrieved articles were hand searched. Data were extracted by two independent reviewers, and methodological quality was assessed using the Jadad score and key aspects of the Cochrane risk of bias. RESULTS Fifteen randomized clinical trials met the inclusion criteria and were included…Expand
Comparison of common interventions for the treatment of infantile colic: a systematic review of reviews and guidelines
TLDR
The strongest evidence for the treatment of colic was probiotics for breastfed infants, followed by weaker but favourable evidence for manual therapy indicated by crying time, which carried a low risk of serious adverse events. Expand
An overview of systematic reviews of complementary and alternative therapies for infantile colic
TLDR
There is clearly a need for larger and more methodologically sound RCTs to be conducted on the effectiveness of some CAM therapies for IC, and particular focus on probiotics in non-breastfed infants is pertinent. Expand
Efeito do Lactobacillus reuteri na cólica infantil: revisão baseada na evidência
TLDR
There is evidence for improvement of symptoms of infantile colic with Lactobacillus reuteri supplementation, compared to placebo (Strength of Recommendation A). Expand
Screening for infantile colic and parents experiences of simethicone and probiotics: a quantitative, descriptive sub-study.
TLDR
Why infants whose parents sought help for colic, where not included in two colic trials are presented and the use and perceived effect of simethicone and probiotics amongst those infants who were included are described. Expand
Perceived effectiveness of complementary medicine by mothers of infants with colic in Gauteng
TLDR
The participants perceived complementary medicines as safe and effective forms of treatment for infantile colic, however, larger scale studies should be conducted to validate this finding. Expand
Complementary and alternative medicine in children: an analysis of the recent literature
TLDR
The use of CAM in children continues to occupy a niche area of interest for many providers and families, but only a minority of articles published in the past year utilized methods of sufficient rigor to provide a useful comparison to more conventional therapies. Expand
Pain-relieving agents for infantile colic.
TLDR
Low-quality evidence suggesting that herbal agents reduce the duration of crying compared with placebo and herbal agents increase response over placebo is found, with different magnitude of benefit noted across studies. Expand
Infantile colic treatment: new prospects
TLDR
There is limited evidence supporting the use of complementary and alternative treatments (herbal supplements, manipulative approach and acupuncture) or behavioral modification interventions, and so new treatments, such as probiotics, have been proposed. Expand
Infantile Colic: The Mysterious Crying
TLDR
A systematic literature review was done on studies regarding pathophysiology, medical and conventional interventions for infantile colic from 1954 to March 2011, finding that simethicone could not significantly control colic, dicyclomine hydrochloride had serious side effects and cimetropium bromide results were favourable, but milder side effects were noted. Expand
Dietary modifications for infantile colic.
TLDR
The primary outcome was duration of crying, and secondary outcomes were response to intervention, frequency of crying episodes, parental/family quality of life, infant sleep duration, parental satisfaction and adverse effects. Expand
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