Nutrition in Bone Health Revisited: A Story Beyond Calcium

@article{Ilich2000NutritionIB,
  title={Nutrition in Bone Health Revisited: A Story Beyond Calcium},
  author={Jasminka Z. Ilich and Jane E. Kerstetter},
  journal={Journal of the American College of Nutrition},
  year={2000},
  volume={19},
  pages={715 - 737}
}
Osteoporosis is a complex, multi-factorial condition characterized by reduced bone mass and impaired micro-architectural structure, leading to an increased susceptibility to fractures. Although most of the bone strength (including bone mass and quality) is genetically determined, many other factors (nutritional, environmental and life-style) also influence bone. Nutrition is important modifiable factor in the development and maintenance of bone mass and the prevention and treatment of… 
Calcium intake and osteoporosis
TLDR
The objective of this work is to revise the relation between calcium intake and bone health, as some doubts concerning this effect still persist.
Nutrition and bone health in the elderly.
TLDR
Daily intake of dairy products, fruit and vegetables, fish meals, and anti-oxidants and phytoestrogenes combined with fish meals several times/week in combination with daily outdoor activities providing sun exposure (vitamin D) and physical training (bone and muscle strength) will most likely reduce the fragility fracture risk in the elderly.
Nutritional aspects of the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.
TLDR
Evidence indicates that a healthy dietary pattern including dairy products, fruit and vegetables and adequate amounts of meat, fish and poultry is positively related to bone health, and mineral and vitamin supplementation should be closely monitored.
Bone and nutrition in elderly women: protein, energy, and calcium as main determinants of bone mineral density
TLDR
Despite the cross-sectional nature of the study, a significant relationship between BMD and several critical nutrients was shown, including energy, protein, calcium, magnesium, zinc and vitamin C.
ORIGINAL COMMUNICATION Bone and nutrition in elderly women: protein, energy, and calcium as main determinants of bone mineral density
TLDR
Despite the cross-sectional nature of this study, it was able to show a significant relationship between BMD and several critical nutrients: energy, protein, calcium, magnesium, zinc and vitamin C.
Impacto dos nutrientes na saúde óssea: novas tendências
TLDR
This review aims at clarifying the impact of nutrients and of calories intake on the bones during different stages in life, describing possible interactions among nutrients and how these could affect bone and mineral homeostasis.
Dietary Protein: An Essential Nutrient For Bone Health
  • J. Bonjour
  • Medicine, Biology
    Journal of the American College of Nutrition
  • 2005
TLDR
The evidence is analyzed that refutes a relation of causality between the elements of this putative patho-physiological “cascade” that purports that animal proteins are causally associated with an increased incidence of osteoporotic fractures.
Exercise, Nutrition, and Bone Health
TLDR
Making healthy nutritional choices, engaging in weight-bearing physical activity, and ensuring optimal hormone levels during growth provides a window of opportunity to build optimal bone mass, to reduce the risk of fracture later in life.
Independent and combined effect of nutrition and exercise on bone mass development
TLDR
Current knowledge about the role of nutrition on the development of bone tissue and how physical activity affects the nutrient-bone relationship is reviewed and needs further in-depth investigation.
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 322 REFERENCES
Dietary calcium, protein, and phosphorus are related to bone mineral density and content in young women.
TLDR
Anthropometric measures were predictors of bone mass and a single ratio of calcium to phosphorus or protein did not optimize bone mass across the range of calcium intakes.
Dietary intake and bone mineral density.
TLDR
The results suggest that bone mass is influenced by dietary factors other than calcium, and iron, zinc and magnesium intake were positively correlated with forearm BMC in premenopausal women.
Calcium, Dairy Products and Osteoporosis
  • R. Heaney
  • Medicine
    Journal of the American College of Nutrition
  • 2000
TLDR
Of 52 investigator-controlled calcium intervention studies, all but two showed better bone balance at high intakes, or greater bone gain during growth, or reduced bone loss in the elderly, or reducing fracture risk, firmly establishes that high calcium intakes promote bone health.
Dietary influences on bone mass and bone metabolism: further evidence of a positive link between fruit and vegetable consumption and bone health?
TLDR
The BMD results confirm previous work (but at peripheral bone mass sites), and the findings associating bone resorption with dietary factors provide further evidence of a positive link between fruit and vegetable consumption and bone health.
Osteoporosis and bone metabolic parameters in dependence upon calcium intake through milk and milk products.
TLDR
It can be stated that the data support the hypothesis that adequate calcium intake through milk and milk products in childhood and adolescence is a decisive marker for obtaining a maximum bone mass (peak adult bone mass) and for the prevention of osteoporosis.
Effects of vitamin K on bone mass and bone metabolism.
TLDR
Insufficient data are available to conclude that the regular administration of vitamin K concentrates will reduce the loss of bone mass in white women at risk for developing postmenopausal osteoporosis.
Primary prevention of osteoporosis: pediatric approach to disease of the elderly.
Calcium, phosphorus and magnesium intakes correlate with bone mineral content in postmenopausal women.
TLDR
The results suggest that nutritional factors are relevant to bone health in postmenopausal women, and dietary supplementation may be indicated for the prophylaxis of osteoporosis.
Potassium, magnesium, and fruit and vegetable intakes are associated with greater bone mineral density in elderly men and women.
TLDR
The hypothesis that alkaline-producing dietary components, specifically, potassium, magnesium, and fruit and vegetables, contribute to maintenance of BMD is supported.
Calcium supplementation and increases in bone mineral density in children.
TLDR
In prepubertal children whose average dietary intake of calcium approximated the recommended dietary allowance, calcium supplementation increased the rate of increase in bone mineral density.
...
...