Nutrition for healthy term infants: recommendations from birth to six months.

@article{2012NutritionFH,
  title={Nutrition for healthy term infants: recommendations from birth to six months.},
  author={},
  journal={Canadian journal of dietetic practice and research : a publication of Dietitians of Canada = Revue canadienne de la pratique et de la recherche en dietetique : une publication des Dietetistes du Canada},
  year={2012},
  volume={73 4},
  pages={
          204
        }
}
  • Published 2012
  • Medicine
  • Canadian journal of dietetic practice and research : a publication of Dietitians of Canada = Revue canadienne de la pratique et de la recherche en dietetique : une publication des Dietetistes du Canada
This joint statement provides health professionals in Canada with evidence-informed principles and recommendations to promote communication of accurate, consistent advice to parents and caregivers on infant nutrition in the first six months. Participating organizations in the Infant Feeding Joint Work Group collaborated to revise guidance from 1998 and 2005. Development of this statement involved an extensive review of scientific evidence in peer-reviewed literature, with content guidance from… 

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