Corpus ID: 45292634

Nutrition and disease in the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study for Evaluation of Cancer (JACC).

@article{Iso2007NutritionAD,
  title={Nutrition and disease in the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study for Evaluation of Cancer (JACC).},
  author={Hiroyasu Iso and Yoshimi Kubota},
  journal={Asian Pacific journal of cancer prevention : APJCP},
  year={2007},
  volume={8 Suppl},
  pages={
          35-80
        }
}
  • H. Iso, Y. Kubota
  • Published 2007
  • Medicine
  • Asian Pacific journal of cancer prevention : APJCP
Nutrition effects on mortality in the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study (JACC Study) were investigated using interview and follow up. Multivitamin and vitamin E use was found to be associated with lower mortality from cerebrovascular disease (CVD). For all causes, CVD and ischemic heart disease (IHD), total energy intake and cutting breakfast were associated with elevated, while rice intake, fruit, sweets, tofu, pickles, dried fish, deep-fried foods, tea and coffee and seaweed were generally… Expand
Seaweed intake and risk of cardiovascular disease: the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective (JPHC) Study.
TLDR
Seaweed intake was inversely associated with risk of ischemic heart disease among a Japanese study population and no significant associations were observed between seaweed intake and risk of total stroke or stroke types among either men or women. Expand
Frequency of Seaweed Intake and Its Association with Cardiovascular Disease Mortality: The JACC Study
TLDR
An inverse association between seaweed intake and cardiovascular mortality among Japanese men and women, especially that from cerebral infarction is found. Expand
Dietary Antioxidant Micronutrients and All-Cause Mortality: The Japan Collaborative Cohort Study for Evaluation of Cancer Risk
TLDR
Higher dietary intakes of antioxidant vitamins may reduce the risk of all-cause mortality in middle-aged Japanese women, especially female non-smokers. Expand
Fruit, vegetable and bean intake and mortality from cardiovascular disease among Japanese men and women: the JACC Study
TLDR
In conclusion, intakes of plant-based foods, particularly fruit intake, were associated with reduced mortality from CVD and all causes among Japanese men and women. Expand
A meta-analysis of prospective studies of coffee consumption and mortality for all causes, cancers and cardiovascular diseases
TLDR
This meta-analysis provides quantitative evidence that coffee intake is inversely related to all cause and, probably, CVD mortality. Expand
Lung cancer risk and consumption of vegetables and fruit: an evaluation based on a systematic review of epidemiological evidence from Japan.
TLDR
It was showed that fruit consumption possibly decreased the risk of lung cancer, but found insufficient evidence of a link with vegetable consumption, and further prospective studies should assess the effects of consuming these food groups. Expand
Fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of cardiovascular disease: A meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies
TLDR
A meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies indicates that increased FV intake is inversely associated with the risk of CVD, providing strong support for the current recommendations to consume a high amount of FV to reduce CVD risk. Expand
Consumption of fruits, vegetables, and seaweeds (sea vegetables) and pancreatic cancer risk: the Ohsaki Cohort Study.
TLDR
Examination of the association (if any) between the consumption of fruits, vegetables, and seaweeds and the risk of pancreatic cancer in Japan found total consumption of fruit, vegetable and seaweed was not associated with a reduced risk of Pancic cancer. Expand
Fruits and Vegetables Intake and Risk of Bladder Cancer
TLDR
Little evidence supports a beneficial effect for total fruits, vegetables, both FVs, and citrus intake against bladder cancer, but green leafy vegetables may help prevent bladder cancer. Expand
Rice intake is associated with reduced risk of mortality from cardiovascular disease in Japanese men but not women.
TLDR
The consumption of steamed rice was associated with reduced risk of mortality from CVD in Japanese men but not women, and this finding necessitates further investigations on the mechanisms leading to this gender difference. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...