Nutrition and benign prostatic hyperplasia

@article{Espinosa2013NutritionAB,
  title={Nutrition and benign prostatic hyperplasia},
  author={Geovanni Espinosa},
  journal={Current Opinion in Urology},
  year={2013},
  volume={23},
  pages={38–41}
}
  • G. Espinosa
  • Published 1 January 2013
  • Medicine
  • Current Opinion in Urology
Purpose of reviewNutrition seems to modify the pathogenesis of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) effect symptomology in men suffering from lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Although there are numerous pharmaceuticals and procedures for these conditions, nutrition may improve outcomes as a primary approach or in tandem with BPH medications or procedures. The purpose of this review is to highlight the benefits of nutrition and dietary supplements in men with BPH and LUTS. Recent… 
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TLDR
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TLDR
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Prevalence, Burden, and Treatment of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms in Men Aged 50 and Older: A Systematic Review of the Literature
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References

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Intakes of energy and macronutrients and the risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia.
BACKGROUND Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common disease of older men. Although the etiology remains unclear, nutritional factors may have an effect on the disease. OBJECTIVE Because the
Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: Does Lifestyle Play a Role?
TLDR
Daily aerobic exercise can reduce all of the plasma factors associated with BPH, particularly when combined with a low-fat, high-fiber diet consisting of whole grains, fruits, and vegetables, and in cell culture studies, this type of lifestyle regimen has recently been shown to reduce the growth of serum-stimulated prostate epithelial cells and thegrowth of androgen-dependent prostate cancer cell lines.
Dietary patterns, supplement use, and the risk of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia: results from the prostate cancer prevention trial.
TLDR
A diet low in fat and red meat and high in protein and vegetables, as well as regular alcohol consumption, may reduce the risk of symptomatic BPH.
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TLDR
The evidence suggests that Serenoa repens improves urologic symptoms and flow measures compared with placebo and is associated with fewer adverse treatment events.
Lycopene inhibits disease progression in patients with benign prostate hyperplasia.
TLDR
In conclusion, lycopene inhibited progression of BPH and symptoms of the disease were improved in both groups with a significantly greater effect in men taking lycopenes supplements.
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TLDR
Increasing doses of a saw palmetto fruit extract did not reduce lower urinary tract symptoms more than placebo and was no more effective than placebo for any secondary outcome.
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TLDR
The low zinc concentrations obtained in patients with prostatitis and prostate cancer, in contrast to the control group, led us to consider the possibility of recommending zinc supplements as a coadjuvant therapy in Patients with prost atitis and to use zinc measurements as another diagnostic tool, for cases in which it is necessary to differentiate benign prostatic hyperplasia from prostate cancer.
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