Nutrient density estimates from an average of food frequency and food records correlate well with serum concentration of vitamins E and the carotenoids in free-living adults.

@article{Dixon1996NutrientDE,
  title={Nutrient density estimates from an average of food frequency and food records correlate well with serum concentration of vitamins E and the carotenoids in free-living adults.},
  author={Zisca Dixon and Betty Jane Burri Burri and Terry Ray Neidlinger},
  journal={International journal of food sciences and nutrition},
  year={1996},
  volume={47 6},
  pages={477-84}
}
Dietary intakes are usually estimated by either a food frequency test, or by food records. We hypothesized that dietary intake estimates for fat soluble vitamins might be more accurate if information from both food frequency tests and food records were used. We estimated dietary intakes in 10 healthy adults by 4 food frequency questionnaires and ten 3-day food records collected over a year. Serum antioxidant nutrient concentrations (vitamins A, E, and the carotenoids) were measured by HPLC… CONTINUE READING