Nuptial feeding in tettigoniids male costs and the rates of fecundity increase

@article{Simmons2004NuptialFI,
  title={Nuptial feeding in tettigoniids male costs and the rates of fecundity increase},
  author={Leigh W. Simmons},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={27},
  pages={43-47}
}
  • L. Simmons
  • Published 1 July 1990
  • Biology
  • Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
SummaryA recent debate has centred on the importance of paternal investment for the origin and maintenance of nuptial feeding in insects. Some authors have argued that the rates of nutrient incorporation are likely to be too slow to allow a male to fertilize the eggs that he helps to produce and cannot be considered as paternal investment. Here I report the results of some experiments that show that the positive effects of nutrient donation on female reproduction for one species of… 
Impact of male condition on his spermatophore and consequences for female reproductive performance in the Glanville fritillary butterfly
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It is shown that spermatophore size increases with male age at first mating, decreases with mating frequency and adult food‐deprivation, and is not influenced by developmental food‐limitation in this species.
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The increase in relative dry weight of hatched larvae was increased, indicating that there may also be a paternal investment effect of the spermatophylax, if the offspring that benefit from sperMatophylAX materials are fathered by the donating male.
Nuptial gifts fail to resolve a sexual conflict in an insect
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Protandry and mate assessment in the wartbiter Decticus verrucivorus (Orthoptera : Tettigoniidae)
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  • Biology
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  • 2004
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It is argued that the explanation for the evolution of protandry in the wartbiter, Decticus verrucivorus, is the result of selection acting on males in relation to sperm competition.
Sexual differences in response to larval food stress in two nuptial feeding orthopterans / implications for sexual selection
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Under experimental food-stress larval female K nartee showed little loss of mass whereas male mass decreased, and the sizes of body parts less critical to mating success showed similar decreases in males and females.
Weighing costs and benefits of mating in bushcrickets (Insecta: Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae), with an emphasis on nuptial gifts, protandry and mate density
TLDR
The view that tettigoniids provide excellent models to test and understand the economics of matings in both sexes is reinforced, focussing on nuptial gifts, their trade-off with male calling songs, protandry and how mate density influences mate choice.
Comparative evidence for a cost to males of manipulating females in bushcrickets
TLDR
Positive relationships were found between the duration of the female's sexual refractory period and both relative ejaculate mass and relative nuptial gift mass, indicating that there is a trade-off between resources spent on spermatophore size and the male's potential mating rate.
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TLDR
The hypothesis that the function of "excess" maledonated nutrition is mating effort that protects the ejaculate is rejected and courtship feeding in R. verticalis may represent parental effort whereby males invest in their own zygotes.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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