Numerical discrimination by frogs (Bombina orientalis)

@article{Stancher2014NumericalDB,
  title={Numerical discrimination by frogs (Bombina orientalis)},
  author={G. Stancher and R. Rugani and L. Regolin and G. Vallortigara},
  journal={Animal Cognition},
  year={2014},
  volume={18},
  pages={219-229}
}
AbstractEvidence has been reported for quantity discrimination in mammals and birds and, to a lesser extent, fish and amphibians. For the latter species, however, whether quantity discrimination would reflect sensitivity to number or to the continuous physical variables that covary with number is unclear. Here we reported a series of experiments with frogs (Bombina orientalis) tested in free-choice experiments for their preferences for different amounts of preys (Tenebrio molitor larvae) with… Expand
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