Number 2 ( Fall 2000 ) ISSUES IN LANGUAGE POLICY AND PLANNING : THE CASE OF NAMIBIA

@inproceedings{Joyce2009Number2,
  title={Number 2 ( Fall 2000 ) ISSUES IN LANGUAGE POLICY AND PLANNING : THE CASE OF NAMIBIA},
  author={Joyce and B. SchwartRobert and G. and Sukumane},
  year={2009}
}
The use of indigenous languages as alternatives for development is now accepted in principle throughout Africa, although it is not stated in most constitutions. In Southern and East Africa, in particular, local languages share, with English, the role of official languages. In Tanzania, for example, English has even been disinstitutionalized altogether and is now taught in the Department of Foreign Languages at the University of Dar-es-Saalam. However, some countries, like Namibia, can make no… CONTINUE READING

References

Publications referenced by this paper.
SHOWING 1-10 OF 12 REFERENCES

Elite closure as boundary maintenance : The case of Africa

C Myers-Scotton
  • Language Policy and Development
  • 1990
VIEW 3 EXCERPTS
HIGHLY INFLUENTIAL

The dynamics of multilingualism : The case of Senegal

G Mansour
  • Jour - nal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development
  • 1980

The consequences of the language policies of African states vis-a-vis education. Language and Linguistic Problems

J. S. Tlou
  • 1977