Nucleus Accumbens Deep Brain Stimulation Decreases Ratings of Depression and Anxiety in Treatment-Resistant Depression

@article{Bewernick2010NucleusAD,
  title={Nucleus Accumbens Deep Brain Stimulation Decreases Ratings of Depression and Anxiety in Treatment-Resistant Depression},
  author={Bettina H. Bewernick and Ren{\'e} Hurlemann and Andreas Matusch and Sarah Kayser and Christiane Grubert and Barbara Hadrysiewicz and Nikolai Axmacher and Matthias R. Lemke and D{\'e}irdre Cooper-Mahkorn and Michael X. Cohen and Holger Brockmann and Doris Lenartz and Volker Sturm and Thomas E. Schlaepfer},
  journal={Biological Psychiatry},
  year={2010},
  volume={67},
  pages={110-116}
}

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