Nucleolus organizers in the wild silkworm Bombyx mandarina and the domesticated silkworm B. mori

@article{Maekawa2004NucleolusOI,
  title={Nucleolus organizers in the wild silkworm Bombyx mandarina and the domesticated silkworm B. mori},
  author={Hideaki Maekawa and Naoko Takada and Kenichi Mikitani and Teru Ogura and Naoko Miyajima and Haruhiko Fujiwara and Masahiko Kobayashi and Osamu Ninaki},
  journal={Chromosoma},
  year={2004},
  volume={96},
  pages={263-269}
}
Two types (Ra1 and Ra2) of nucleolus organizers were identified in the genome of Bombyx mandarina (Japan) which occurs in Japan. Genetical analysis of a hybrid with B. mori suggested that the loci of both nucleolus organizers are allelic and correspond to the R0 locus of B. mori. These nucleolus organizers segregated and were inherited by the progeny in a Mendelian fashion. The majority of the Ra1 rDNA units were 10.6 kb in length and had an additional EcoRI site in the transcribed spacer… Expand

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