Nuclear organization of the genome and the potential for gene regulation

@article{Fraser2007NuclearOO,
  title={Nuclear organization of the genome and the potential for gene regulation},
  author={Peter Fraser and Wendy A. Bickmore},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2007},
  volume={447},
  pages={413-417}
}
Much work has been published on the cis-regulatory elements that affect gene function locally, as well as on the biochemistry of the transcription factors and chromatin- and histone-modifying complexes that influence gene expression. However, surprisingly little information is available about how these components are organized within the three-dimensional space of the nucleus. Technological advances are now helping to identify the spatial relationships and interactions of genes and regulatory… Expand
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