Nuclear Democracy

@article{Kaiser2002NuclearD,
  title={Nuclear Democracy},
  author={David Kaiser},
  journal={Isis},
  year={2002},
  volume={93},
  pages={229 - 268}
}
The influential Berkeley theoretical physicist Geoffrey Chew renounced the reigning approach to the study of subatomic particles in the early 1960s. The standard approach relied on a rigid division between elementary and composite particles. Partly on the basis of his new interpretation of Feynman diagrams, Chew called instead for a “nuclear democracy” that would erase this division, treating all nuclear particles on an equal footing. In developing his rival approach, which came to dominate… Expand

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 28 REFERENCES
Social Interests and the Organic Physics of 1847
AXIOMATIC S-MATRIX THEORY
Egalitarianism in a World of Difference : Identity and Ideology in the Science of Meghnad Saha , ” unpublished MS . On Sakata see “ Philosophical and Methodological Problems in Physics
  • Purely Practical Revolutionaries : A History of Stalinist Theoretical Physics
  • 1999
Chs. 8-11; and Lillian Hoddeson
  • The Rise of the Standard Model: Particle Physics in the 1960s and 1970s
  • 1997
...
1
2
3
...