Nuclear DNA sequences from the Middle Pleistocene Sima de los Huesos hominins

@article{Meyer2016NuclearDS,
  title={Nuclear DNA sequences from the Middle Pleistocene Sima de los Huesos hominins},
  author={Matthias Meyer and Juan Luis Arsuaga and Cesare de Filippo and Sarah Nagel and Ayinuer Aximu-Petri and Birgit Nickel and Ignacio Mart{\'i}nez and Ana Gracia and Jos{\'e} Mar{\'i}a Berm{\'u}dez de Castro and Eudald Carbonell and Bence Viola and Janet Kelso and Kay Pr{\"u}fer and Svante P{\"a}{\"a}bo},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2016},
  volume={531},
  pages={504-507}
}
A unique assemblage of 28 hominin individuals, found in Sima de los Huesos in the Sierra de Atapuerca in Spain, has recently been dated to approximately 430,000 years ago. [] Key Result Here we recover nuclear DNA sequences from two specimens, which show that the Sima de los Huesos hominins were related to Neanderthals rather than to Denisovans, indicating that the population divergence between Neanderthals and Denisovans predates 430,000 years ago. A mitochondrial DNA recovered from one of the specimens…

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