Nuclear DNA sequences detect species limits in ancient moa

@article{Huynen2003NuclearDS,
  title={Nuclear DNA sequences detect species limits in ancient moa},
  author={Leon Huynen and Craig D Millar and R. Paul Scofield and David M. Lambert},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2003},
  volume={425},
  pages={175-178}
}
Ancient DNA studies have typically used multi-copy mitochondrial DNA sequences. This is largely because single-locus nuclear genes have been difficult to recover from sub-fossil material, restricting the scope of ancient DNA research. Here, we have isolated single-locus nuclear DNA markers to assign the sex of 115 extinct moa and, in combination with a mitochondrial DNA phylogeny, tested competing hypotheses about the specific status of moa taxa. Moa were large ratite birds that showed extreme… Expand
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